What place should culture and creative thinking have in education?

We are taking part in a UK-wide project to find out whether there is a gap in the way children are currently taught about culture and encouraged to think creatively.

Our Director of Education, Jacqui O’Hanlon will explore these questions and look for evidence as part of the Durham Commission on Creativity and Education. She's one of 17 leading figures from business, the cultural sector, policy and academia.

The Commission will collect evidence from across the UK and beyond on creative thinking and cultural education. They will look for examples of best practice and explore the benefits of children having creative education as part of the curriculum.

 

Jacqui O'Hanlon headshot, outside smiling
Director of Education, Jacqui O'Hanlon

They will look at the advantages of a creative education in terms of:

  • economic growth
  • skills and social mobility
  • community identity and social engagement
  • personal fulfilment and well-being

This is a joint project between Arts Council England and Durham University. A final report of the findings will be released in summer 2019.

As part of the first stage of the research, you can register your interest, or find out more through the Commission’s website which launched today at www.durham.ac.uk/creativitycommission. A full list of the commissioners is available on the website.