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  • Romeo

    Romeo is the only child of Lord and Lady Montague. When we first meet him, he believes he is in love with Rosaline, but then he meets Juliet at a party. They instantly fall in love and are married in secret the next day. The pair are separated after Romeo kills Tybalt and is banished. A plan to reunite them goes wrong when Romeo believes Juliet is dead. At the end of the play, Romeo kills himself.

    Facts we learn about Romeo at the start of the play:

    • He didn’t take part in the street brawl with the Capulets.
    • He is depressed because he loves Rosaline but she does not love him back.
    • He agrees to go to the party with his friends to prove to them that Rosaline is the most beautiful woman there.

    Things they say:

    'O, I am fortune’s fool' (Romeo, 3:1)

    Romeo feels cheated by the fates.

    Things others say about them:

    '…Verona brags of him / To be a virtuous and well-governed youth.' (Lord Capulet, 1:5)

    Romeo is a sensible and honourable young man.

    'He’s not the flower of courtesy, but I’ll warrant him as gentle as a lamb.' (The Nurse, 2:5)

    Romeo is not always polite but he is a gentleman.

    'And he will make the face of heaven so fine, / That all the world will be in love with night.' (Juliet, 3:2)

    Juliet thinks Romeo is very handsome.

  • Juliet

    Juliet is the only child of Lord and Lady Capulet. She has been promised in marriage to Paris. At a party, she meets Romeo and instantly falls in love with him, even though he is her ‘enemy’ and a Montague. Juliet marries Romeo in secret the next day but they are separated after Romeo kills her cousin Tybalt. In order to avoid marrying Paris, Juliet fakes her own death. Romeo believes her to be dead and kills himself. When she wakes up, and discovers his body, Juliet stabs herself with his dagger.

    Facts we learn about Juliet at the start of the play:

    • She is thirteen years old.
    • She has yet to be introduced to society.
    • She intends to obey her parents’ wishes.

    Things they say:

    'I’ll look to like, if looking liking move, / But no more deep will I endart mine eye / Than your consent gives strength to fly.' (Juliet, 1:4)

    Juliet intends to do what her parents want.

    'Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?' (Juliet, 3:2)

    Juliet is honourable and loyal.

    'If all else fail, myself have power to die' (Juliet, 3:5)

    Juliet is strong-willed.

    Things others say about them:

    'My child is yet a stranger in the world, / She hath not seen the change of fourteen years' (Capulet, 1:2)

    Juliet is very young.

    'Now comes the wanton blood up in your cheeks. / They’ll be in scarlet straight at any news.' (The Nurse, 2:6)

    Juliet comes across as innocent.

    'It is the east and Juliet is the sun' (Romeo, 2:1)

    Juliet is beautiful.

  • Friar Laurence

    Friar Laurence is a Franciscan monk. We first meet him the morning after the party when Romeo goes to him for permission to marry Juliet. Despite telling Romeo to slow down, he agrees to marry the young couple, as he believes it may be a way to end the feud between the Montagues and the Capulets. Later in the play, when Romeo is banished for killing Tybalt, Friar Laurence sends him to Mantua. He also gives Juliet the potion that will make her appear dead.

    Facts we learn about Friar Laurence at the start of the play:

    • Friar Laurence understands botany and the potential for plants to heal people.
    • He is a religious man.
    • He is a confidant of Romeo and knows about his love for Rosaline.
    • He wants peace between the Montagues and Capulets.

    Things they say:

    'I am the greatest, able to do least, / Yet most suspected, as the time and place / Doth make against me of this direful murder; / And here I stand, both to impeach and purge / Myself condemned and myself excused.' (Friar Laurence, 5:3)

    Friar Laurence feels responsible for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet.

    Things others say about them:

    'Oh Lord, I could have stay’d here all the night / To hear good counsel. O, what learning is' (The Nurse, 3:3)

    Friar Laurence is an educated man.

    'We still have known thee for a holy man.' (Paris, 5:3)

    Friar Laurence is well respected in Verona.

  • The Nurse

    The Nurse is a servant in the Capulet household and has looked after Juliet since she was a baby. We first meet her helping Juliet get ready for the Capulet ball. After the ball, Juliet tells the Nurse about her feelings for Romeo and she delivers messages between the two lovers throughout the play. Despite helping them, she continually tries to convince Juliet to marry Paris. She isn’t seen again after Juliet fakes her own death and is taken to the family tomb.

    Facts we learn about The Nurse at the start of the play:

    • She was Juliet’s wet-nurse.
    • She had her own child, Susan, who died.
    • She is trusted within the Capulet household.
    • She is trusted by Juliet who confides in her.

    Things they say:

    'And I might live to see thee married once, / I have my wish.' (The Nurse, 1:3)

    The Nurse has her own wishes for Juliet’s future.

    'I am none of his flirt-gills, I am none of his skains-mates.' (The Nurse, 2:4)

    The Nurse is able to look after herself.

    'I speak no treason.' (The Nurse, 3:5)

    The Nurse speaks the truth to her employer.

    Things others say about them:

    'I have remembered me, thou’s hear our counsel.' (Lady Capulet, 1:3)

    The Nurse is a trusted and important part of the Capulet household.

    'Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse…' (Juliet, 3:5)

    The Nurse has a warm and loving relationship with Juliet.

  • Lord Capulet

    Lord Capulet is the head of one of the noble families of Verona, the Capulets. He talks to Paris, who wants to marry his daughter Juliet, and suggests that Paris join them at a ball he is holding so that he and Juliet can meet. At the ball he stops Tybalt from fighting with Romeo, to keep the peace. Lord Capulet later decides that Juliet should marry Paris as soon as possible to help her get over the grief of Tybalt’s death. When she refuses he threatens to disown her. At the end of the play he makes peace with the Montague family.

    Facts we learn about Lord Capulet at the start of the play:

    • He is an old man.
    • He can have a fiery temper.
    • He wants Juliet to marry well but feels she should have a say in who she marries.
    • He is as much to blame for the feud as Lord Montague.

    Things they say:

    'But Montague is bound as well as I, / In penalty alike; and 'tis not hard, I think, / For men so old as we to keep the peace.' (Lord Capulet, 1:2)

    Lord Capulet wants to keep the peace.

    'God's bread! it makes me mad: / Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play, / Alone, in company, still my care hath been / To have her match'd….' (Lord Capulet, 3:5)

    Lord Capulet spends a lot of time thinking about making a good match for Juliet and is ‘mad’ when she refuses.

    '…My heart is wondrous light / Since this same wayward girl is so reclaim’d.' (Lord Capulet, 4:2)

    Lord Capulet’s love for Juliet is very strong.

    Things others say about them:

    'A crutch, a crutch! why call you for a sword?' (Lady Capulet, 1:1)

    Lord Capulet is an elderly man who can’t fight anymore.

    'Of honourable reckoning are you both.' (Paris, 1:2)

    Lord Capulet is honourable and well thought of by other nobles.

    'You are too hot' (Lady Capulet, 3:5)

    Lord Capulet has a quick temper.

  • Lady Capulet

    Lady Capulet is the wife of Lord Capulet. At the start of the play she tells her daughter Juliet about the proposal of marriage from Paris and is excited for her. She seeks justice for Tybalt’s murder and later tries to calm Lord Capulet down when Juliet refuses to marry Paris, although she walks away from Juliet herself at the end of the scene. At the end of the play she finds her daughter’s body.

    Facts we learn about Lady Capulet at the start of the play:

    • She gave birth to Juliet when she was only a few years older than Juliet is at the start of the play.
    • She is younger than her husband.
    • She wants Juliet to marry Paris.

    Things they say:

    '…By my count / I was your mother much upon these years / That you are now a maid' (Lady Capulet, 1:3)

    Lady Capulet had Juliet when she was around her age.

    'Talk not to me, for I’ll not speak a word. / Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee.' (Lady Capulet, 3:5)

    Lady Capulet rejects Juliet when she disobeys her parents.

    '…This sight of death is as a bell / That warns my old age to a sepulchre.' (Lady Capulet, 5:3)

    Lady Capulet is upset that Juliet has died.

    Things others say about them:

    '…the lady of the house, / And a good lady, and a wise and virtuous.' (The Nurse, 1:5)

    Lady Capulet is well respected.

  • Mercutio

    Mercutio is a family member of the prince and best friend of Romeo. We first meet him with Romeo and Benvolio just before the ball where he gives the famous ‘Queen Mab’ speech. Later, he challenges Tybalt to a fight which ends in his death and, as he dies, he calls down a ‘plague’ on both houses.

    Facts we learn about Mercutio at the start of the play:

    • He is a nobleman in the city of Verona.
    • He talks as if he understands love and emotions.
    • He is a good friend of Romeo and Benvolio.

    Things they say:

    'Give me a case to put my visage in: A visor for a visor.' (Mercutio, 1:4)

    Mercutio hides who he truly is.

    'I am the very pink of courtesy' (Mercutio, 2:4)

    Mercutio claims he is courteous and friendly.

    Things others say about them:

    '…brave Mercutio is dead.' (Benvolio, 3:1)

    Mercutio is brave.

    'Mercutio, thou consortest with Romeo.' (Tybalt, 3:1)

    Mercutio and Romeo are close friends.

  • Benvolio

    Benvolio is Romeo’s cousin. At the start of the play he tries to stop the street brawl between the two households but is quickly drawn into it by Tybalt. He discovers that Romeo is upset because Rosaline doesn’t love him and tries to cheer Romeo up by convincing him to go to a party where he might meet other women who will take his mind off Rosaline. The next day he is present when Tybalt kills Mercutio and Romeo then kills Tybalt.

    Facts we learn about Benvolio at the start of the play:

    • He tries to ‘keep the peace’ when he discovers the brawl.
    • He has something on his mind (although we never discover what it is) that has caused him to wake up early in the morning.
    • He believes he has a good relationship with Romeo.
    • He is trusted by Romeo’s parents who turn to him when they are not sure what is wrong with their son.

    Things they say:

    'I do but keep the peace' (Benvolio, 1:1)

    Benvolio tries to keep the peace.

    'A troubled mind drove me to walk abroad' (Benvolio, 1:1)

    Benvolio is confused about his own feelings.

    'I drew to part them' (Benvolio, 1:1)

    Benvolio takes action to try and stop conflict.

    Things others say about them:

    'Come, come, thou art as hot a Jack in thy mood as any in Italy, and as soon moved to be moody, and as soon moody to be moved.' (Mercutio, 3:1)

    Benvolio has a quick temper.

    'He is a kinsman to the Montague; / Affection makes him false; he speaks not true.' (Lady Capulet, 3:1)

    Benvolio is loyal to the Montague family and would possibly lie for them.

  • Tybalt

    Tybalt is the nephew of Lady Capulet. At the start of the play he is involved in a street brawl with the Montagues. Later, he is offended by Romeo’s presence at the Capulets’ ball but is calmed by Lord Capulet who does not want Tybalt to start an argument. The next day he searches for Romeo to get revenge for the insult but gets into a fight with Mercutio. He kills Mercutio in the fight. He is then killed by Romeo.

    Facts we learn about Tybalt at the start of the play:

    • He hates the Montagues.
    • He has a quick temper.
    • He is a good swordsman and is sometimes known as 'Prince of Cats'.

    Things they say:

    '…I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.' (Tybalt, 1:1)

    Tybalt hates the Montagues.

    'Patience perforce with willful choler meeting / Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting' (Tybalt, 1:5)

    Tybalt has a quick temper.

    Things others say about them:

    'You are a saucy boy…You are a princox…' (Lord Capulet, 1:5)

    Tybalt is disrespectful.

    'More than Prince of Cats. O, he’s the courageous captain of compliments.' (Mercutio, 2:4)

    Tybalt is a very good swordsman.

  • Paris

    Paris is a family member of the Prince and a nobleman. We first meet him when he asks Lord Capulet for permission to marry Juliet and then after Tybalt’s death, when he asks for permission to marry Juliet again. Despite not wanting to let him marry Juliet at first, Lord Capulet eventually agrees and sets a date for their marriage. When Juliet is believed to be dead, Paris visits her tomb to mourn but is interrupted by Romeo. They fight and Paris is killed.

    Facts we learn about Paris at the start of the play:

    • He wants to marry Juliet.
    • He has asked Lord Capulet for permission to marry her.
    • He is neutral in the feud between Capulet and Montague.

    Things they say:

    'Have I thought long to see this morning’s face…' (Paris, 4:5)

    Paris has wanted to marry Juliet for a long time.

    'The obsequies that I for thee will keep / Nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep.' (Paris, 5:3)

    Paris mourns over Juliet’s grave every night.

    Things others say about them:

    'Verona’s summer hath not such a flower' (Lady Capulet, 1:3)

    Paris is handsome.

    'O, he's a lovely gentleman!…an eagle, madam, / Hath not so green, so quick, so fair an eye / As Paris hath.' (The Nurse, 3:5)

    Paris is revered in Verona.

  • Lord and Lady Montague

    Lord and Lady Montague are Romeo’s parents. Lady Montague has to restrain her husband from fighting with the Capulets in the opening scene of the play and is grateful to find her son Romeo was not involved in the ‘fray’. They are both concerned about their son’s behaviour and how withdrawn he has been. Lady Montague later dies of ‘grief’ when Romeo is banished and Lord Montague reconciles with Lord and Lady Capulet after his son’s death – promising to build a statue in pure gold to honour Juliet.

    Facts we learn about Lord and Lady Montague at the start of the play:

    • They only have one son, Romeo.
    • They care about Romeo a lot and have tried to find out why he is so withdrawn.
    • They are enemies with the Capulets but Lady Montague does not like the fighting and is glad Romeo is not involved.

    Things they say:

    ‘Thou shalt not stir one foot to seek a foe.’ (Lady Montague, 1:1)

    Lady Montague is peaceful and does not want her husband to fight.

    ‘Could we but learn from whence his sorrows grow, / We would as willingly give cure as know.’ (Montague 1:1)

    Lord Montague cares about his son.

    ‘Thou villain Capulet! – Hold me not, let me go.’ (Montague, 1:1)

    Lord Montague wants to fight.

    Things others say about them:

    ‘Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word, / By thee, old Capulet, and Montague’ (Prince, 1:1)

    Lord Montague is old and his words are the cause of the fighting.

Explore their relationships

Romeo

  • Romeo - Mercutio

    Romeo and Mercutio are close friends. Romeo does not want to go to a party as he is feeling depressed about Rosaline and Mercutio tries to cheer him up.

    Romeo: ‘I am not for this ambling. / Being but heavy, I will bear the light.’
    Mercutio: ‘Nay, gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.’ (1:4)

    Romeo meets his friends, including Mercutio, the morning after the ball and is in a much better mood. The friends swap jokes with each other.

    ‘Why, is not this better now than groaning for love? Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo.’ (Mercutio, 2:4)
    ‘Thou wast never with me for anything when thou wast not there for the goose.’ (Romeo, 2:4)

    Mercutio defends Romeo against Tybalt in Act 3 but is disappointed that Romeo won’t fight.

    ‘O calm, dishonourable, vile submission!’ (Mercutio, 3:1)
    ‘Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.’ (Romeo, 3:1)

    Mercutio blames Romeo for his death and curses both the Montagues and the Capulets as he is dying.

    ‘A plague o' both your houses!’ (Mercutio, 3:1)

  • Romeo - Benvolio

    Benvolio has promised Lord and Lady Montague he’ll find out why Romeo has been depressed and help him if he can.

    Benvolio: ‘Be rul’d by me, forget to think of her.’
    Romeo: ‘O teach me how I should forget to think.’ (1:1)

    After Romeo has killed Tybalt, Benvolio helps him to escape and is a loyal friend to him.

    ‘Romeo, away, be gone. The Prince will doom thee death if thou art taken.’ (Benvolio, 3:1)

  • Romeo - Friar Laurence

    Romeo asks Friar Laurence if he’ll marry him and Juliet. They share a line when they greet each other, and seem to have a close and trusting relationship.

    Romeo: ‘Good morrow, father’
    Friar Laurence: ‘Benedicite. What early tongue so sweet saluteth me?’ (2:3)

    Friar Laurence marries Romeo and Juliet even though he questions Romeo’s love for Juliet. He seems to help because he thinks it might end their families’ feud.

    ‘So smile the heavens upon this holy act.’ (Friar Laurence, 2:6)

    Friar Laurence tells Romeo about his banishment in Act 3 and helps him to flee Verona although Romeo does not want to leave and would rather die.

    Romeo: ‘Calling death ‘banished’ / Thou cut’st my head off with a golden axe / And smilest upon the stroke that murders me.'
    Friar Laurence: ‘Oh deadly sin, O rude unthankfulness.’ (3:4)

    Friar Laurence fails to get a message to Romeo to inform him that Juliet's death is fake.

    'The letter was not nice but full of charge, / Of dear import, and the neglecting it / May do much danger' (Friar Laurence, 5:2)

    Friar Laurence attempts to meet Romeo at Juliet's tomb to tell him that Juliet is not really dead, but arrives too late and then leaves without Juliet. He blames himself for their deaths.

    'Ah, what an unkind hour / Is guilty of this lamentable chance!' (Friar Laurence, 5:3)

  • Romeo - Juliet

    Romeo and Juliet meet at the ball and they are instantly drawn to each other.

    ‘If I profane with my unworthiest hand / This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: / My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand / To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.’ (Romeo, 1:5)

    ‘Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, / Which mannerly devotion shows in this; / for saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, / And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.’ (Juliet, 1:5)

    Romeo takes a risk to see Juliet by going into the Capulet orchard. When they talk in Act 2 Scene 2, they have strong feelings for each other.

    ‘that which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet; / So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd, / Retain that dear perfection which he owes / Without that title.’ (Juliet, 2:2)
    ‘With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls.’ (Romeo, 2:2)

    They both go to Friar Laurence to be married, despite their families’ feud.

    ‘if the measure of thy joy / Be heap'd like mine…let rich music's tongue / Unfold the imagined happiness that both / Receive in either by this dear encounter.’ (Romeo, 2:6)
    ‘…my true love is grown to such excess / I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth.’ (Juliet, 2:6)

    When Juliet finds out Romeo killed Tybalt, she is distraught but still loves Romeo.

    'O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! / Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? / Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! / Dove-feather'd raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!' (Juliet, 3:2)

    Their attempts to be together fail and both choose death rather than living without the other.

    'I still will stay with thee / And never from this palace of dim night / Depart again.’ (Romeo, 5:3)
    'O happy dagger, / This is thy sheath: there rust, and let me die.’ (Juliet, 5:3)

  • Romeo - Lord and Lady Monatgue

Juliet

  • Juliet - Lady Capulet

    At the start of the play Lady Capulet asks for Juliet’s opinion on marriage and Juliet responds politely. Their relationship seems formal but respectful.

    ‘What say you, can you love the gentleman?’ (Lady Capulet, 1:3)
    ‘I'll look to like, if looking liking move: But no more deep will I endart mine eye Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.’ (Juliet, 1:3)

    Lady Capulet brings Juliet the news that she is to be married to Paris in Act 3 and seems excited that Juliet will be happily married. Juliet openly disagrees.

    ‘But now I’ll tell thee joyful tidings, girl’ (Lady Capulet, 3:5)
    ‘Now by Saint Peter’s church, and Peter too, He shall not make me a happy bride.’ (Juliet, 3:5)

    Later in Act 3 Scene 5, rather than defend her daughter against Lord Capulet when he calls her a ‘wretch’ and threatens to disown her, Lady Capulet seems to give up on her daughter and walks away from her.

    ‘Talk not to me, for I’ll not say a word. Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee.’ (Lady Capulet, 3:5)
    ‘O sweet my mother, cast me not away…’ (Juliet, 3:5)

    Lady Capulet’s attitude towards Juliet changes when Juliet agrees to marry Paris, and she treats her with respect. However, Juliet knows she doesn’t intend to go ahead with the marriage so there is a dishonesty between them that wasn’t there before.

    Lady Capulet: ‘Good night. Get thee to rest, for thou hast need.’
    Juliet: ‘Farewell. God knows when we shall meet again.’ (4:3)

    Lady Capulet is devastated by the death of Juliet.

    ‘Accursed, unhappy, wretched, hateful day! Most miserable hour that e'er time saw. In lasting labour of his pilgrimage! But one, poor one, one poor and loving child, But one thing to rejoice and solace in, And cruel death hath catch'd it from my sight!’ (Lady Capulet, 4:5)

  • Juliet - Lord Capulet

    When talking to Paris, who wants to marry Juliet, Lord Capulet protects his daughter. He tells Paris that Juliet is too young to marry and that she will be involved in choosing her own husband.

    ‘But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart, / My will to her consent is but a part; / An she agree, within her scope of choice / Lies my consent and fair according voice.’ (Lord Capulet, 1:2)

    Lord Capulet threatens to disown Juliet when she refuses to marry Paris, suggesting she is ungrateful.

    ‘Hang thee, young baggage! disobedient wretch! / I tell thee what: get thee to church o' Thursday, / Or never after look me in the face.’ (Lord Capulet, 3:5)
    ‘Good father, I beseech you on my knees.’ (Juliet, 3:5)

    Juliet lies to Lord Capulet, telling her family she will marry Paris even though she doesn’t intend to go ahead with the marriage.

    ‘Why, I am glad on't; this is well: stand up: This is as't should be.’ (Lord Capulet, 4:2)
    ‘…am enjoin'd By holy Laurence to fall prostrate here, And beg your pardon.’ (Juliet, 4:2)

    When Juliet dies, Lord Capulet is upset by her death and regrets what has happened.

    ‘Death, that hath ta'en her hence to make me wail, Ties up my tongue, and will not let me speak.’ (Lord Capulet, 4:5)

  • Juliet - Tybalt

    Juliet is upset when her cousin Tybalt dies and she discovers Romeo has killed him. Her family think her grief is for Tybalt, which suggests they were close.

    ‘My dearest cousin’ (Juliet, 3:5)

  • Juliet - Romeo

    Romeo and Juliet meet at the ball and they are instantly drawn to each other.

    ‘If I profane with my unworthiest hand / This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: / My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand / To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.’ (Romeo, 1:5)

    ‘Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, / Which mannerly devotion shows in this; / for saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, / And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.’ (Juliet, 1:5)

    Romeo takes a risk to see Juliet by going into the Capulet orchard. When they talk in Act 2 Scene 2, they have strong feelings for each other.

    ‘that which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet; / So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd, / Retain that dear perfection which he owes / Without that title.’ (Juliet, 2:2)
    ‘With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls.’ (Romeo, 2:2)

    They both go to Friar Laurence to be married, despite their families’ feud.

    ‘if the measure of thy joy / Be heap'd like mine…let rich music's tongue / Unfold the imagined happiness that both / Receive in either by this dear encounter.’ (Romeo, 2:6)
    ‘…my true love is grown to such excess / I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth.’ (Juliet, 2:6)

    When Juliet finds out Romeo killed Tybalt, she is distraught but still loves Romeo.

    'O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! / Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? / Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! / Dove-feather'd raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!' (Juliet, 3:2)

    Their attempts to be together fail and both choose death rather than living without the other.

    'I still will stay with thee / And never from this palace of dim night / Depart again.’ (Romeo, 5:3)
    'O happy dagger, / This is thy sheath: there rust, and let me die.’ (Juliet, 5:3)

  • Juliet - Paris

    Paris asks Lord Capulet for Juliet’s hand in marriage. Capulet thinks she is too young but Paris disagrees.

    ‘Younger than she are happy mothers made.’ (Paris, 1:2)

    Once again Paris asks for Juliet’s hand in marriage and this time Capulet agrees. They are unaware she has just married Romeo. Juliet refuses to marry him.

    ‘These times of woe afford no time to woo. / Madam, good night: commend me to your daughter.’ (Paris, 3:4)
    ‘O, sweet my mother, cast me not away! / Delay this marriage for a month, a week; / Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed / In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.’ (Juliet, 3:5)

    Juliet chances to meet Paris at Friar Laurence’s cell. He thinks they are to marry in a few days’ time but Juliet knows she won’t marry him.

    Paris: ‘Happily met, my lady and my wife.’
    Juliet: ‘That may be, sir, when I am a wife.’ (4:1)

    Juliet tells her father that she intends to marry Paris even though she is actually going to take the potion the Friar has given her.

    ‘I met the youthful lord at Laurence' cell; / And gave him what becomed love I might, / Not step o'er the bounds of modesty.’ (Juliet, 4:2)

    Paris mourns over Juliet’s body at the Capulet family tomb and is upset to know she is dead.

    ‘Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew, --/ O woe! thy canopy is dust and stones;-- / Which with sweet water nightly I will dew, / Or, wanting that, with tears distill'd by moans: / The obsequies that I for thee will keep / Nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep.’ (Paris, 5:3)

  • Juliet - The Nurse

Friar Laurence

  • Friar Laurence - Romeo

    Romeo asks Friar Laurence if he’ll marry him and Juliet. They share a line when they greet each other, and seem to have a close and trusting relationship.

    Romeo: ‘Good morrow, father’
    Friar Laurence: ‘Benedicite. What early tongue so sweet saluteth me?’ (2:3)

    Friar Laurence marries Romeo and Juliet even though he questions Romeo’s love for Juliet. He seems to help because he thinks it might end their families’ feud.

    ‘So smile the heavens upon this holy act.’ (Friar Laurence, 2:6)

    Friar Laurence tells Romeo about his banishment in Act 3 and helps him to flee Verona although Romeo does not want to leave and would rather die.

    Romeo: ‘Calling death ‘banished’ / Thou cut’st my head off with a golden axe / And smilest upon the stroke that murders me.'
    Friar Laurence: ‘Oh deadly sin, O rude unthankfulness.’ (3:4)

    Friar Laurence fails to get a message to Romeo to inform him that Juliet's death is fake.

    'The letter was not nice but full of charge, / Of dear import, and the neglecting it / May do much danger' (Friar Laurence, 5:2)

    Friar Laurence attempts to meet Romeo at Juliet's tomb to tell him that Juliet is not really dead, but arrives too late and then leaves without Juliet. He blames himself for their deaths.

    'Ah, what an unkind hour / Is guilty of this lamentable chance!' (Friar Laurence, 5:3)

The Nurse

  • The Nurse - Juliet

  • The Nurse - Lady Capulet

Lord Capulet

  • Lord Capulet - Juliet

    When talking to Paris, who wants to marry Juliet, Lord Capulet protects his daughter. He tells Paris that Juliet is too young to marry and that she will be involved in choosing her own husband.

    ‘But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart, / My will to her consent is but a part; / An she agree, within her scope of choice / Lies my consent and fair according voice.’ (Lord Capulet, 1:2)

    Lord Capulet threatens to disown Juliet when she refuses to marry Paris, suggesting she is ungrateful.

    ‘Hang thee, young baggage! disobedient wretch! / I tell thee what: get thee to church o' Thursday, / Or never after look me in the face.’ (Lord Capulet, 3:5)
    ‘Good father, I beseech you on my knees.’ (Juliet, 3:5)

    Juliet lies to Lord Capulet, telling her family she will marry Paris even though she doesn’t intend to go ahead with the marriage.

    ‘Why, I am glad on't; this is well: stand up: This is as't should be.’ (Lord Capulet, 4:2)
    ‘…am enjoin'd By holy Laurence to fall prostrate here, And beg your pardon.’ (Juliet, 4:2)

    When Juliet dies, Lord Capulet is upset by her death and regrets what has happened.

    ‘Death, that hath ta'en her hence to make me wail, Ties up my tongue, and will not let me speak.’ (Lord Capulet, 4:5)

  • Lord Capulet - Tybalt

    Tybalt has a strong sense of family loyalty to Lord Capulet, telling him when Romeo comes to the Capulet Ball, but Capulet seems to think Tybalt is too quick to anger.

    ‘You are a saucy boy…You are a princox. Be quiet, or I'll make you quiet.’ (Lord Capulet, 1:5)
    ‘Why, uncle, ‘tis a shame’ (Tybalt, 1:5)

  • Lord Capulet - Lady Capulet

    Lord and Lady Capulet seem to agree with each other most of the time. Lady Capulet tries to defend her daughter against Lord Capulet’s rage briefly in Act 3, but ultimately sides with her husband against her daughter.

    ‘Fie, fie, what, are you mad?’ (Lady Capulet, 3:5)

Lady Capulet

  • Lady Capulet - Juliet

    At the start of the play Lady Capulet asks for Juliet’s opinion on marriage and Juliet responds politely. Their relationship seems formal but respectful.

    ‘What say you, can you love the gentleman?’ (Lady Capulet, 1:3)
    ‘I'll look to like, if looking liking move: But no more deep will I endart mine eye Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.’ (Juliet, 1:3)

    Lady Capulet brings Juliet the news that she is to be married to Paris in Act 3 and seems excited that Juliet will be happily married. Juliet openly disagrees.

    ‘But now I’ll tell thee joyful tidings, girl’ (Lady Capulet, 3:5)
    ‘Now by Saint Peter’s church, and Peter too, He shall not make me a happy bride.’ (Juliet, 3:5)

    Later in Act 3 Scene 5, rather than defend her daughter against Lord Capulet when he calls her a ‘wretch’ and threatens to disown her, Lady Capulet seems to give up on her daughter and walks away from her.

    ‘Talk not to me, for I’ll not say a word. Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee.’ (Lady Capulet, 3:5)
    ‘O sweet my mother, cast me not away…’ (Juliet, 3:5)

    Lady Capulet’s attitude towards Juliet changes when Juliet agrees to marry Paris, and she treats her with respect. However, Juliet knows she doesn’t intend to go ahead with the marriage so there is a dishonesty between them that wasn’t there before.

    Lady Capulet: ‘Good night. Get thee to rest, for thou hast need.’
    Juliet: ‘Farewell. God knows when we shall meet again.’ (4:3)

    Lady Capulet is devastated by the death of Juliet.

    ‘Accursed, unhappy, wretched, hateful day! Most miserable hour that e'er time saw. In lasting labour of his pilgrimage! But one, poor one, one poor and loving child, But one thing to rejoice and solace in, And cruel death hath catch'd it from my sight!’ (Lady Capulet, 4:5)

  • Lady Capulet - Lord Capulet

    Lord and Lady Capulet seem to agree with each other most of the time. Lady Capulet tries to defend her daughter against Lord Capulet’s rage briefly in Act 3, but ultimately sides with her husband against her daughter.

    ‘Fie, fie, what, are you mad?’ (Lady Capulet, 3:5)

  • Lady Capulet - The Nurse

  • Lady Capulet - Tybalt

Mercutio

  • Mercutio - Romeo

    Romeo and Mercutio are close friends. Romeo does not want to go to a party as he is feeling depressed about Rosaline and Mercutio tries to cheer him up.

    Romeo: ‘I am not for this ambling. / Being but heavy, I will bear the light.’
    Mercutio: ‘Nay, gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.’ (1:4)

    Romeo meets his friends, including Mercutio, the morning after the ball and is in a much better mood. The friends swap jokes with each other.

    ‘Why, is not this better now than groaning for love? Now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo.’ (Mercutio, 2:4)
    ‘Thou wast never with me for anything when thou wast not there for the goose.’ (Romeo, 2:4)

    Mercutio defends Romeo against Tybalt in Act 3 but is disappointed that Romeo won’t fight.

    ‘O calm, dishonourable, vile submission!’ (Mercutio, 3:1)
    ‘Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.’ (Romeo, 3:1)

    Mercutio blames Romeo for his death and curses both the Montagues and the Capulets as he is dying.

    ‘A plague o' both your houses!’ (Mercutio, 3:1)

Benvolio

  • Benvolio - Romeo

    Benvolio has promised Lord and Lady Montague he’ll find out why Romeo has been depressed and help him if he can.

    Benvolio: ‘Be rul’d by me, forget to think of her.’
    Romeo: ‘O teach me how I should forget to think.’ (1:1)

    After Romeo has killed Tybalt, Benvolio helps him to escape and is a loyal friend to him.

    ‘Romeo, away, be gone. The Prince will doom thee death if thou art taken.’ (Benvolio, 3:1)

  • Benvolio - Lord and Lady Montague

Tybalt

  • Tybalt - Lord Capulet

    Tybalt has a strong sense of family loyalty to Lord Capulet, telling him when Romeo comes to the Capulet Ball, but Capulet seems to think Tybalt is too quick to anger.

    ‘You are a saucy boy…You are a princox. Be quiet, or I'll make you quiet.’ (Lord Capulet, 1:5)
    ‘Why, uncle, ‘tis a shame’ (Tybalt, 1:5)

  • Tybalt - Juliet

    Juliet is upset when her cousin Tybalt dies and she discovers Romeo has killed him. Her family think her grief is for Tybalt, which suggests they were close.

    ‘My dearest cousin’ (Juliet, 3:5)

  • Tybalt - Lady Capulet

Paris

  • Paris - Juliet

    Paris asks Lord Capulet for Juliet’s hand in marriage. Capulet thinks she is too young but Paris disagrees.

    ‘Younger than she are happy mothers made.’ (Paris, 1:2)

    Once again Paris asks for Juliet’s hand in marriage and this time Capulet agrees. They are unaware she has just married Romeo. Juliet refuses to marry him.

    ‘These times of woe afford no time to woo. / Madam, good night: commend me to your daughter.’ (Paris, 3:4)
    ‘O, sweet my mother, cast me not away! / Delay this marriage for a month, a week; / Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed / In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.’ (Juliet, 3:5)

    Juliet chances to meet Paris at Friar Laurence’s cell. He thinks they are to marry in a few days’ time but Juliet knows she won’t marry him.

    Paris: ‘Happily met, my lady and my wife.’
    Juliet: ‘That may be, sir, when I am a wife.’ (4:1)

    Juliet tells her father that she intends to marry Paris even though she is actually going to take the potion the Friar has given her.

    ‘I met the youthful lord at Laurence' cell; / And gave him what becomed love I might, / Not step o'er the bounds of modesty.’ (Juliet, 4:2)

    Paris mourns over Juliet’s body at the Capulet family tomb and is upset to know she is dead.

    ‘Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew, --/ O woe! thy canopy is dust and stones;-- / Which with sweet water nightly I will dew, / Or, wanting that, with tears distill'd by moans: / The obsequies that I for thee will keep / Nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep.’ (Paris, 5:3)

Lord and Lady Montague

  • Lord and Lady Montague - Romeo

  • Lord and Lady Montague - Benvolio

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