Thousands of young people take part in our Macbeth live lesson

We streamed our Live Lesson for Macbeth direct into classrooms today (20 April) so that students across the UK could take part in the 45-minute lesson.

Young people had a unique insight into the creative process and interpretive choices that directors and actors make as they prepare to stage a new show.

Actor Niamh Cusack, who plays Lady Macbeth, explored some of the approaches to her key speeches, working with the play's Assistant Director, Peter Bradley.

Our Deputy Artistic Director Erica Wyman said: "I hope that offering this very special access will give young people a real sense of the challenge and pleasures of bringing this amazing play to life.

“Rehearsal rooms are spaces of intense learning - not dissimilar to a classroom - so giving students the chance to join us on our creative journey will not only give them a better understanding of Shakespeare’s play, but a real insight into how we arrive at some of the creative decisions and choices that we make.”

 

A woman kneels at the edge of the stage holding a letter.
Niamh Cusack as Lady Macbeth
Photo by Richard Davenport © RSC Browse and license our images

Today's Live Lesson is followed by the schools' broadcast of Macbeth next Thursday (26 April) when the full production, with Christopher Eccleston in the title role, will be screened for free, directly into schools around the country.

More than 220,000 students are registered to watch and take part, with the opportunity to ask members of the cast and creative team questions as part of a live Q&A.

On Friday 26 April, Macbeth will be screened directly into schools around the country with over 220, 000 young people registered to take part.  Students will get the opportunity to ask members of the cast and creative team questions as part of a live Q&A http://www.rsc.org.uk/education/schools-broadcasts

 

Erica Wyman, the RSC’s Deputy Artistic Director, said:

“We are extremely excited to open our rehearsal room doors to young people. Rehearsals are traditionally a sacred space for actors and directors where they can experiment, explore and try out different approaches before they are ready to perform their work in front of an audience. I hope that offering this very special access will give young people a real sense of the challenge and pleasures of bringing this amazing play to life.

 

“Rehearsal rooms are spaces of intense learning - not dissimilar to a classroom - so giving students the chance to join us on our creative journey will not only give them a better understanding of Shakespeare’s play, but a real insight into how we arrive at some of the creative decisions and choices that we make”.

 

On Friday 26 April, Macbeth will be screened directly into schools around the country with over 220, 000 young people registered to take part.  Students will get the opportunity to ask members of the cast and creative team questions as part of a live Q&A http://www.rsc.org.uk/education/schools-broadcasts

 

Erica Wyman, the RSC’s Deputy Artistic Director, said:

“We are extremely excited to open our rehearsal room doors to young people. Rehearsals are traditionally a sacred space for actors and directors where they can experiment, explore and try out different approaches before they are ready to perform their work in front of an audience. I hope that offering this very special access will give young people a real sense of the challenge and pleasures of bringing this amazing play to life.

 

“Rehearsal rooms are spaces of intense learning - not dissimilar to a classroom - so giving students the chance to join us on our creative journey will not only give them a better understanding of Shakespeare’s play, but a real insight into how we arrive at some of the creative decisions and choices that we make”.