Whispers from the Wings

To Russia

September 19, 2012

The second two weeks were devoted to Boris Godunov. Again we delve straight into a history that is unknown to most of us. Russia!

A history as vast as its nation. Michael begins working on individual scenes quite quickly, while we do our best to learn about the time period.

To help us in this, Michael brings in Martin Sixsmith. Martin was a BBC correspondent, most notably in Russia, from 1980 to 1997. He came in, shook hands with us all, sat down, and began to speak.

After a couple of hours we were so clued up on Russia that our heads were buzzing with ideas. We ran out and bought his book too, Russia: A 1000 Year Chronicle of the Wild East. It's huge and daunting, but it reads so easily and is incredibly informative…and most importantly, is proving itself tremendously useful to us in our research.

We also had a 'Balance and Stability' workshop with Lina Johansson of the theatre company Mimber. I'll leave out the details so as not to spoil things, but suffice it to say we did things people don't normally do everyday. Who needs a surfboard when you have a real person instead? And sore the next day? You don't know the meaning of sore until someone's standing on top of your head.

by Youssef Kerkour  |  1 comment


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Comments

Oct 2, 4:42pm
Joanna

"You don't know the meaning of sore until someone's standing on top of your head." Haha! Nice one! Hope your hands are not sore from other workshops and you'll have time to write another update soon. They're a pleasure to read.

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