A conference series for 16-19s, powered by Samsung

For the Good of Rome is a programme of one day conferences and digital experiences for A-Level students.

Shakespeare's Roman plays address so many important and relevant themes, asking us to explore how and why people become leaders and what our roles are as citizens. To help us explore these ideas we are asking you to consider three different statements:

  1. Politics is inherently unfair in a system where it will always be the few making decisions on behalf of the many. 
  2. The art of rhetoric has no power or place in modern politics. 
  3. The qualities we admire in male leaders are seen as negative in women. 

Do you agree or disagree with these statements? How have systems and views changed and have they changed enough? Join us in exploring these central questions in one of the following ways:

A young woman smiles broadly as she talks to another young woman as they stand in the auditorium
Photo by Rob Freeman © RSC – Image Licensing

Discovering Rome

Watch an introduction to the series, followed by the conference hosts introducing the three provocations, considering some of the issues and questions around each one. Whether you're joining us in Stratford-upon-Avon, taking part in a streamed discussion or thinking about which provocation you want to create a film about, these questions are a great starting point. 

Citizenship (6 April) - with Iqbal Khan

Politics is inherently unfair in a system where it will always be the few making decisions on behalf of the many. 

  • Is it ever fair to have a few select people speaking on behalf of everyone?
  • Do you feel represented by the system in this country and what can you to make sure you do? Is it your responsibility or someone else's to make sure your voice is heard?

Rhetoric (2 May) - with George Alagiah

The art of rhetoric has no power or place in modern politics. 

  • Does rhetoric and the art of persuasive speaking still exist in modern politics, where political figures engage in social media?
  • How does modern political speaking compare to the speeches and tactics used in Shakespeare's plays? 

Women as Leaders (8 May) - with Erica Whyman

The qualities we admire in male leaders are seen as negative in women. 

  • Do you think we hold women in positions of power or authority to a different standard, or have different expectations of them?
  • What ways of exerting power and influence do we see female characters use in these plays?  

New education technology partnership

Text Detectives

Online Performances

Schools' Broadcasts

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