This conference series for 16-19s, powered by Samsung, took place earlier this year but the discussions continue.

For the Good of Rome was a programme of one day conferences and digital experiences in April and May 2017. Designed for for A-Level students, they ran alongside our Rome MMXVII Season.

Shakespeare's Roman plays address so many important and relevant themes, asking us to explore how and why people become leaders and what our roles are as citizens.

To help us explore these ideas we asked students at the conference to consider three statements (or 'provocations'):

  1. Politics is inherently unfair in a system where it will always be the few making decisions on behalf of the many. 
  2. The art of rhetoric has no power or place in modern politics. 
  3. The qualities we admire in male leaders are seen as negative in women. 

Do you agree or disagree with these statements? How have systems and views changed and have they changed enough?

Join us in exploring these questions further. These conferences have now finished but you can still take part in our Film Challenge (deadline 18 October 2017).

Our 2017 production of Julius Caesar

Watch videos

The conference discussions were live streamed via YouTube. If you missed out, you can re-watch them or browse the videos below in which speakers explore the provocations on camera.

In these videos, the conference hosts introduce the three provocations, considering some of the issues and questions around each one.

If you are submitting a film to our Film Challenge, these questions and below videos are a great starting point. 

Citizenship (6 April) - with Iqbal Khan

Politics is inherently unfair in a system where it will always be the few making decisions on behalf of the many. 

  • Is it ever fair to have a few select people speaking on behalf of everyone?
  • Do you feel represented by the system in this country and what can you to make sure you do? Is it your responsibility or someone else's to make sure your voice is heard?

Rhetoric (2 May) - with George Alagiah

The art of rhetoric has no power or place in modern politics. 

  • Does rhetoric and the art of persuasive speaking still exist in modern politics, where political figures engage in social media?
  • How does modern political speaking compare to the speeches and tactics used in Shakespeare's plays? 

Women as Leaders (8 May) - with Erica Whyman

The qualities we admire in male leaders are seen as negative in women. 

  • Do you think we hold women in positions of power or authority to a different standard, or have different expectations of them?
  • What ways of exerting power and influence do we see female characters use in these plays?  
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Students returned to take part in a Makers' Lab in June 2017
Photo courtesy of © Samsung Browse and license our images

AN EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY PARTNERSHIP

These conferences, the Makers' Lab and Film Challenge form part of our digital education partnership with Samsung.