Alice Birch

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Alice Birch received the Arts Foundation Award for Playwriting in 2014 and was shortlisted for the Bruntwood Prize 2013. Her plays include Open Court – Soap Opera (part of Royal Court's Open Court Season); Little on the Inside (part of Almeida Festival 2013); Life for Beginners and Many Moons.

Her new play Revolt. She said. Revolt again is part of Midsummer Mischief's Programme A, with Timberlake Wertenbaker's The Ant and the Cicada.

Book for Programme A >>

Alice Birch Q&A

What was your initial reaction to the provocation that 'well behaved women rarely make history'?

Frustrated. A bit tickled (because I spent a long time trying to list well behaved historical women). Mainly angry. I wanted to unpick what well behaved actually meant. Probably quiet. And not taking up too much space. Which is going to limit your ability to make history. I tried to imagine what a well behaved man would be like. The concept sounded ridiculous. I got angry again. In short, I felt provoked.

What excites you about coming to The Other Place?

Firstly, it's the RSC. Which my Mum has heard of - so she's delighted. And it's the RSC. Which is wonderful and not just a little bit overwhelming. But it's The Other Place. Which has these anarchic, revolutionary, theatrical roots. It's felt like the biggest offering and the most enormous challenge of my career.

In a nutshell tell me about your play.

It's a series of attempts at a revolution. In big and small ways. It is hopefully quite funny. And also quite sad. It is quite resolutely not a well behaved play. Which makes it very difficult to summarise.

Why should people come and see your play?

Because it's in rep with a new Timberlake Wertenbaker play. Because humankind still has lots of work to do. Because it is an anarchic, show-off of a play, that would really love to be seen.

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