Learning Lines

'I want to know what happens next'

July 10, 2014

As part of our most recent schools broadcast (of Henry IV Parts I and II), we offered schools and/or students with hearing difficulties the opportunity to watch a BSL signed version of the performance.

Ellie Ellie, aged 14, is a student at the Royal School for the Deaf, Derby. She likes reading, drama and creative writing.

After watching the live broadcast of Henry IV Part I as well as the live Q&A, all I can say is that it's phenomenal. At the beginning I admit I did get bored at the start of the play but it was where everything was being explained and as soon as the plot fell into place, I was engrossed into the play; the fight scenes were especially my favourite, it seemed so realistic and unbelievable.

Once the play ended, I just craved for more and I'm desperate to watch Henry IV Part II because I want to know what happens next. The actors just seem so sincere and passionate with what they do; making me feel as if I'm being sucked into the world of Shakespeare and want to be involved.

The only disadvantages was that the language were difficult to pick up on at the beginning, and the fact that some of the characters were hard to recognise, but if you pay attention it gets easier to understand the language and get to grips with the characters.

The play was educational as well, yet it wasn't overly obvious that it was actually helping us learn more about Shakespeare's work; which is a massive bonus. My friends and I were just so immersed in the play, we barely spoke a word to each other- unless something exciting happened and we would fidget excitedly - and this was truly a good experience.

Overall, I'd give it a four out of five!

by Student bloggers  |  No comments yet


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Teaching Shakespeare